Los Angeles, California
Noise Monitoring Services


Occupational (OSHA) Noise Surveys

We provide noise surveys and studies for determination of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) noise limit compliance in the workplace. The OSHA noise limits permit employees to be exposed to an average noise level of up to 90 dBA during an 8-hour working day. Above 85 dBA, precautions are required to protect employees, including a hearing conservation program and noise monitoring program. Workers may never be exposed to peak noise levels above 140 dB.

The OSHA noise regulations permit assessment of noise levels in two ways. We can perform both types of measurement:

  • Personal sampling using sound dosimeters attached to employees. This technique is generally used when workers have high mobility and are exposed to varying noise levels; and
  • Area sampling, in which sound level meters are used to measure noise in work areas. The noise exposure of workers is calculated based on the time spent in the areas measured.

We can give you guidance on the type of monitoring best suited to your facility. Noise dosimetry is often recommended for workers with high mobility or whose exposure levels vary throughout a workday. Area sampling is a simpler, less time-consuming method. This method is suitable where steady noise sources are present or when employee activities are predictable.

Before performing a sound level exposure survey at your facility, we will discuss the noise issues with supervisors or managers to gain a full understanding of the noise problems. Our work will involve measurement of the noise levels as well as making observations for potential noise control solutions.

If exceedances of the OSHA noise standards are measured, our engineers can recommend mitigation measures and administrative techniques to bring worker noise exposure into compliance. We will submit a report detailing the noise exposure levels and an evaluation with reference to the OSHA noise limits.

Contact us to find out more about our OSHA noise assessment services. For the full OSHA noise limits, please visit the Occupational Safety and Health Administration website.